6 Notes

Geek’s Guide To: THE HUNGER GAMES

Okay, yes, the hype is quickly increasing to Twilight proportions. But one thing I can say about the Hunger Games trilogy is that… I actually liked the books.

It’s true. I happened upon them in my brother’s room a few months before news of the movies came out, and like a proper bibliophile I set about to reading them. I devoured the first book in hours.

(photo from Google Images)

Granted, it’s an easy read, having been made for teenagers, but I can’t deny that Suzanne Collins managed to give me those special chills I get when perusing a book of constant excitement (I believe the critical term is “page-turner”). I especially liked how she kept the love story angle an angle, and not, as the case of certain other writers, the end-all, be-all of the plot.

So whether you’re a seasoned reader (and tough to impress, having been There And Back Again many times over) or a total noob (of the type to ask, Why Read When There’s A Movie), I suggest you give the novels a shot because

a) it’s a great place for neophytes to begin nurturing the bibliophile within… and a good way for old hands to give themselves a break from the intensity of, say, Robert Jordan’s (so far) 13-book read-a-thon. Also, 

b) how can anyone not like the idea of young people battling it out in a fight to the death? I mean really. It’s Battle Royale for teens and English-speakers.

One thing I will say against the books, though: the first one was the best. As I went on I began to get the feeling Collins was writing to finish instead of writing to write, which I thought was a shame.

Still, I recommend them for casual readers young and old—if only to be able to discuss with me whether or not Jennifer Lawrence was a good choice for the movie adaptation (for the record, I’m a fan).

(photo from Cambio.com)

P.S. The first film’s coming out March 24 here in the Philippines, if I’m not mistaken. Catching Fire, the sequel, is set for November 2013.

Replies

Likes

  1. jessica-mendoza posted this

 

Reblogs